How I Work: Evernote Part 2

Around the time I wrote my first post about Evernote, those wonderful developers released a huge update that I had no clue about! This update included one specific feature that has changed the way I work.

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REMINDERS!

The reminders feature is really three tools in one beautiful package.

  1. It allows you to assign a due date to notes.
  2. It allows you to keep important notes at the top of your notebook.
  3. It can act as a task manager. (as opposed to a task list inside of a note, which I have never used)

I now use reminders to keep track of everything I need to do, and I organize them based on their category or event.

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This combined with Evernote’s Web Clipper extension for Chrome has made Evernote exponentially more useful to me. When someone emails me a request to do something, I simply create a note from the email inside of Gmail. I can even put it in the proper notebook and set it as a reminder!

The one thing it doesn’t do is allow you to create a recurring task. For this reason, I keep my recurring tasks in Any.do.

How I Work: Evernote Part 2

How I Work: Todo Lists

Task management has been an obsession of mine for a long time. I am constantly on the look out for new apps to try. I still have yet to find the perfect app for me, but I’m closer than I have ever been.

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For a long time I used Wunderlist. Wunderlist is a beautiful app, and is available for pretty much everything. It is extremely powerful and robust, even without a Pro account.

Therein lies problem #1. It’s a freemium service. To get the good features, you’ve gotta pay. It’s still very powerful without a free account, but this brings me to problem #2. Even the free version can be overly complicated for a task manager.

I need a task manager that is super simple. Not for me, but for my coworkers. I want to be able to assign tasks to everyone on our church staff*. For this to happen, the app needs to be super intuitive, and not feature-rich.

*I believe Wunderlist requires a Pro account for this, which is problem #3.

Enter Any.DO.

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Beautifully simple. Super intuitive. Completely free.

Any.DO has the ability to be as simple or complex as you’d like it. It is completely based around when tasks need to be done. This can be as simple as “Today, Tomorrow, Upcoming, or Some Day”, or as complex as “Every Tuesday at 2:31pm”.

Any.DO gives you a notification every morning to remind you to plan your day. This is probably my favorite feature. It helps me set the tone for the rest of my day. It goes through every task for the day and asks if and when you would like to be reminded about them. You can also delay a task for another day if you’d like.

Another neat feature is if you mention a contact name in a task it puts a button to the right to give you easy access to contact the person.

However, Any.DO is not without flaws. Syncing between multiple devices doesn’t feel consistently fluid, but it’s getting better. It is only available for iPhones, Android phones and as a Chrome extension or Chrome¬†desktop app (a new type of Chrome extension that was recently introduced). There is no official tablet version, nor is there a self-installing desktop app (however, the Chrome app is pretty nifty, and feels like a desktop app).

I have only recently started using the task assigning/sharing features, but it seems to work great, as long as you use the same email address that the other person used to sign into Any.DO with.

If Any.DO fixes the minor syncing issues and creates an official iPad app, they will completely win me over.

How I Work: Todo Lists